Sources for Writing Help

Writing is a craft and a craft takes time and practice to hone. It’s not always easy to know what sources are truly helpful, though. If you have a true passion for writing and are actively seeking a way to better your writing career, check out these cool Sources for Writing Help!

 

Plot Perfect

Sources for Writing HelpBuild an Exceptional Plot, One Scene at a Time! Think of your favorite story–the one that kept you turning pages late into the night, the one with a plot so compelling, so multilayered, so perfect that you couldn’t put it down. How can you make your own plots–in your novels, short stories, memoirs, or screenplays–just as irresistible?

Plot Perfect provides the answer. This one-of-a-kind plotting primer reveals the secrets of creating a story structure that works–no matter what your genre. It gives you the strategies you need to build a scene-by-scene blueprint that will help elevate your fiction and earn the attention of agents and editors.

Inside, literary agent, editor, and author Paula Munier shows you how to:

  • Devise powerful plots and subplots and weave them together seamlessly
  • Organize your scenes for the greatest impact
  • Develop captivating protagonists, worthy antagonists, and engaging secondary characters
  • Use dialogue, setting, tone, and voice to enhance your plot
  • Layer, refine, and polish your storyline
  • Define your story in terms of its theme

Filled with writing exercises, plotting templates, and expert advice, Plot Perfect helps you dive into the intricacies of plot–and write a compelling story that readers won’t be able to resist.


How to Market a Book

Sources for Writing HelpDo you want to discover how to build an author career for the long-term as well as spike your book sales right now?If you don’t know much about marketing, don’t worry. We all start with nothing.

I’m Joanna Penn and back in 2008, I had no book sales, no audience, no website, no social media, no podcast, no email list. No nothing.

Now I’m a New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of thrillers and non-fiction. My books have sold over 500,000 copies in 83 countries, and I’m an award-winning creative entrepreneur and international speaker, making a multi-six-figure income with my writing.

Learning how to market my books and my personal brand changed my life. Yes, you need to write an awesome book, but you also need to know how to get it in front of the right readers.

How to Market a Book is for authors who want to sell more books, but it’s also for those writers who want to think like an entrepreneur and build a long-term income. It’s for traditionally published authors who want to take control of their future, and for self-published authors who want to jump-start a career.

There are short-term tactics for those who want to boost immediate sales, but the focus of the book is more about instilling values and marketing principles that will help your long-term career as a writer.

It’s also about going beyond just the book, because these methods can take you from being an author into making money from other products, professional speaking, and creating opportunities that you can’t even imagine yet.


Emotion Thesaurus

(“One my own most used sources to help better my writing!” -Lilian Oake)

Sources for Writing HelpOne of the biggest problem areas for writers is conveying a character’s emotions to the reader in a unique, compelling way. This book comes to the rescue by highlighting 75 emotions and listing the possible body language cues, thoughts, and visceral responses for each. Using its easy-to-navigate list format, readers can draw inspiration from character cues that range in intensity to match any emotional moment. The Emotion Thesaurus also tackles common emotion-related writing problems and provides methods to overcome them. This writing tool encourages writers to show, not tell emotion and is a creative brainstorming resource for any fiction project.

Fantasy Fiction Formula

Sources for Writing HelpThere’s more to writing a successful fantasy story than building a unique world or inventing new magic. How exactly is a plot put together? How do you know if your idea will support an entire novel? How do you grab reader attention and keep it? How do you create dynamic, multi-dimensional characters? What is viewpoint and do you handle it differently in urban fantasy than in traditional epics? What should you do if you’re lost in the middle? How do you make your plot end up where you intend it to go?
Don’t forget to check out these tips for self-publishing!

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